interviewing 

Today I interviewed someone who's been working in tech for twice as long as I've even been working at all. They were interviewing to be a DevOps/Systems Engineer and stated that they work heavily with shell scripts.

I'm willing to accept that interviewing pressure causes generally worse performance than usual, but it took 3 tries when whiteboarding to arrive at a solution to print to stderr.

Today's the interview that convinced me I need far more "basics" questions ready.

interviewing 

Honestly, the whole experience of being on the other side of an interview has been eerie. I had no idea how difficult it can be to find people with appropriately matched skills.

The only reason some of these interviews have been so shocking is because when I read their resume's/CV's they list several years of experience and then don't seem to be able to do more than restate their resume or handle the basics, if that.

interviewing 

@architect oh tell me about it. Wait till you get the ones fresh out of collage no experience and expect 6 digits and yet can't answer the most basic questions. Clams to be linux expert and and does not know where log files are located at.

interviewing 

@omnipotens Thankfully the one kid fresh out of college I met that recently got hired was looking for something much more reasonable and (perhaps due to some lunch conversations prior to him getting hired) knew all too well that he's not an expert yet.

Sounds like those interviews can be a good sadism outlet though if they're particularly cocky: "without spawning any additional processess, how would you calculate the length of a string on the command line?"

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@architect @omnipotens I would probably fail most interviews, but I'm curious about the answer for "without spawning any additional processess, how would you calculate the length of a string on the command line?" With my limited knowledge (although motivated to learn more) I would take a guess and reply:

myVar="newnix"; echo "${}"

interviewing 

@frank @omnipotens
Yep, though an ideal solution would be generalized to a certain degree.

strlen() {
[ -n "${1}" ] && echo "${#1}"
}

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interviewing 

@architect @omnipotens At least I got the brace expansion right. So I guess I show potential for a junior position ;)

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@frank @architect The hardest part for me is definitely finding people who are not siloed. In the 5g lab you pretty much need to be strong in networking,linux, storage, hardware, OpenStack, openshift, VMware, Kubernetes, docker, scripting/coding and mostly a lot more I am not thinking about at the moment. So finding people that know it all is hard to find. Everyone seems very siloed to just one thing. People who code rarely know networking and etc.

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@omnipotens @frank It's pretty similar for us right now, though probably to a lesser extent in at least a few fields.
Since we do R&D projects, you have to be able to at least start troubleshooting at any given layer or domain from filesystems to virtualization to code, networks and at least basic security. We don't necessarily need cross-domain experts, we just need people who know enough to understand how to start digging into various technologies and how they interop.

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@architect @frank yeah I get that but for some damn reason I become the go to expert for everything. Even if I have no clue what it is lol. I haven't been stumped yet but damn I wish I could have some help to push crap too. At lease I finally got a good scripting person to push that off too. I even got other labs calling me asking for help troubleshoot issues.

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